BIG TIME SENSUALITY
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TEAM AVATAR + NAME MEANINGS

inspiration [x]

(Source: linbabefongs)

(Source: beifongacademy)

(Source: zenmasterdre)

suicidewatch:

1991: The Year Punk Broke

magoberry:

FUCK nintendo (opens my wallet) i CANNOT believe they’re selling this shit (pulls out $150) an entirely new fucking console that’s exactly like the old one (gives money to cashier) all it is is a new fucking button the 3ds doesnt have (goes home with my new 3ds ll) this is fucking bullshit god damn it (buys and plays all the games that come out for it) fuck nintendo

americanninjax:

animationforce:

Have you heard? Dreamworks Animation and Studio Mir, the company behind Nickelodeon’s The Legend of Korra, announced Thursday they will work together to produce up to four new animated television series in the next four years. 
This is huge both because a Korean company has never partnered on such a large scale with an American animation group, and because these shows will be created in 2D animation. I’m ecstatic!
It’s great to see that Korean animation is being taken seriously enough to be treated as a creative equal rather than just as a source of cheap production. Studio Mir’s work is undeniably beautiful, and if Mir’s talent can be combined with the storytelling prowess exhibited in How to Train Your Dragon 2, I will be a very happy customer. 
An article inthe Korea Herald had the following to say: 

“The contract with DreamWorks is meaningful since we will be working as partners,” Studio Mir founder and executive producer Yoo Jae-myung said.
“This has never been done before by a Korean studio.”
 A Studio Mir spokesman said details regarding the titles of the cartoons could not be revealed, but that they would be in 2-D.

This is great news for both companies, since each has had some fairly concerning press in the past few weeks, between the financial troubles of Dreamworks Animation (now under direction of new chief financial officer Fazal Merchant) and the on-again/off-again nature of Korra Book Three, now safely on Nick.com. 
Speaking of The Legend of Korra, Studio Mir uploaded a lovely picture on Facebook yesterday thanking fans for their support of Book Three. 

- Courtney (HarmonicaCave)

Hadn’t heard about this at all. That’s awesome.

americanninjax:

animationforce:

Have you heard? Dreamworks Animation and Studio Mir, the company behind Nickelodeon’s The Legend of Korra, announced Thursday they will work together to produce up to four new animated television series in the next four years. 

This is huge both because a Korean company has never partnered on such a large scale with an American animation group, and because these shows will be created in 2D animation. I’m ecstatic!

It’s great to see that Korean animation is being taken seriously enough to be treated as a creative equal rather than just as a source of cheap production. Studio Mir’s work is undeniably beautiful, and if Mir’s talent can be combined with the storytelling prowess exhibited in How to Train Your Dragon 2, I will be a very happy customer. 

An article inthe Korea Herald had the following to say: 

“The contract with DreamWorks is meaningful since we will be working as partners,” Studio Mir founder and executive producer Yoo Jae-myung said.

“This has never been done before by a Korean studio.”

 A Studio Mir spokesman said details regarding the titles of the cartoons could not be revealed, but that they would be in 2-D.

This is great news for both companies, since each has had some fairly concerning press in the past few weeks, between the financial troubles of Dreamworks Animation (now under direction of new chief financial officer Fazal Merchant) and the on-again/off-again nature of Korra Book Three, now safely on Nick.com

Speaking of The Legend of Korra, Studio Mir uploaded a lovely picture on Facebook yesterday thanking fans for their support of Book Three. 

From Studio Mir's Facebook page

- Courtney (HarmonicaCave)

Hadn’t heard about this at all. That’s awesome.

alt-j:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

benedict cumberbatch harasses a black youth

this is the fifth time I’ve reblogged this i don’t care

alt-j:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

benedict cumberbatch harasses a black youth

this is the fifth time I’ve reblogged this i don’t care

(Source: icachondeo)

beyondthebedlam:

lilnympho:

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

This makes me so sad

:(

beyondthebedlam:

lilnympho:

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

This makes me so sad

:(

viikindsofpizzacore:

zavila:

Swans, from A Long Slow Screw (1986)

Brutality at some of it’s finest

viikindsofpizzacore:

zavila:

Swans, from A Long Slow Screw (1986)

Brutality at some of it’s finest

clgdoublelifts:

*mentioning internet friends to parents*

we went to school together before they moved away a couple years ago.. did i never mention them.. weird.. totally went to school together..